Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click on 'Find out more' to see our Cookie statement.

Scientists from the universities of Oxford, Shanghai and Beijing who discovered that natural silks get stronger the colder they get, have finally solved the puzzle of why.

None
Load More

Similar stories

Joining the spots: leopard print fashion and big cat conservation

Research Zoology

Researchers at the Department of Zoology's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit explore the extent of public interest in leopard print fashion, and whether this interest could be harnessed for the benefit of the animals through a ‘species royalty’ initiative.

‘Citizen scientists’ help researchers gather new insights into polar bear behaviour

Citizen science Research Zoology

Oxford University is working with Canadian researchers on a first-of-its-kind project that will engage citizen volunteers to help advance knowledge about polar bear behaviour in a changing environment by analysing a decade’s worth of images captured by trail cameras.

Winners announced for Oxford’s Beyond Boundaries art competition to encourage inclusion in STEM sciences

Equality and Diversity Materials science Plant sciences Statistics Zoology

Oxford University has today announced the winners of its science-inspired schools’ art competition Beyond Boundaries which was launched to encourage inclusion in science research

From The Conversation: Mars InSight: why we’ll be listening to the landing of the Perseverance rover

Earth sciences Physics Research The Conversation

Ben Fernando (Departments of Earth Sciences and Physics) writes about using the Insight mission to detect seismic signals during the landing of Perseverance - the first time that anyone has tried using a spacecraft on the surface of another planet to detect another spacecraft arriving.

From The Conversation: Spider legs build webs without the brain’s help – providing a model for future robot limbs

The Conversation Zoology

Fritz Vollrath from the Department of Zoology writes in an article published on The Conversation.

New machine learning system developed to identify deteriorating patients in hospital

Biomedical engineering Medical science Research

Researchers in Oxford have developed a machine learning algorithm that could significantly improve clinicians’ ability to identify hospitalised patients whose condition is deteriorating to the extent that they need intensive care.

Similar stories

Joining the spots: leopard print fashion and big cat conservation

Research Zoology

Researchers at the Department of Zoology's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit explore the extent of public interest in leopard print fashion, and whether this interest could be harnessed for the benefit of the animals through a ‘species royalty’ initiative.

‘Citizen scientists’ help researchers gather new insights into polar bear behaviour

Citizen science Research Zoology

Oxford University is working with Canadian researchers on a first-of-its-kind project that will engage citizen volunteers to help advance knowledge about polar bear behaviour in a changing environment by analysing a decade’s worth of images captured by trail cameras.

Winners announced for Oxford’s Beyond Boundaries art competition to encourage inclusion in STEM sciences

Equality and Diversity Materials science Plant sciences Statistics Zoology

Oxford University has today announced the winners of its science-inspired schools’ art competition Beyond Boundaries which was launched to encourage inclusion in science research

From The Conversation: Mars InSight: why we’ll be listening to the landing of the Perseverance rover

Earth sciences Physics Research The Conversation

Ben Fernando (Departments of Earth Sciences and Physics) writes about using the Insight mission to detect seismic signals during the landing of Perseverance - the first time that anyone has tried using a spacecraft on the surface of another planet to detect another spacecraft arriving.

From The Conversation: Spider legs build webs without the brain’s help – providing a model for future robot limbs

The Conversation Zoology

Fritz Vollrath from the Department of Zoology writes in an article published on The Conversation.

New machine learning system developed to identify deteriorating patients in hospital

Biomedical engineering Medical science Research

Researchers in Oxford have developed a machine learning algorithm that could significantly improve clinicians’ ability to identify hospitalised patients whose condition is deteriorating to the extent that they need intensive care.