Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click on 'Find out more' to see our Cookie statement.

WildCRU's David Macdonald writes a blog about the efforts to ban logging at Ulu Muda forest reserve (one of their clouded leopard study sites (in Malaysia) and how WildCRU’s research played a significant role in this achievement.

A clouded leopard

Last year, WildCRU led the creation of the “Saving Ulu Muda” video to inform the wider public of the importance of Ulu Muda as a water catchment reserve and as home to many forest species. The video, also published in Malay, was broadcast on national television and helped secure the 102K signatures to a petition calling for the protection of the Ulu Muda forest. Just one month after this petition was sent to the Federal Government, logging permits were revoked.

Led by Dr. Cedric Tan, our past research on clouded leopards at Ulu Muda from 2014-2016, provided essential information on the species diversity there. Our findings were included in the “Saving Ulu Muda” video, in formal letters sent by WildCRU and the Malaysian Wildlife Department to the Kedah state government and finally in the petition. Further, our research on the two largest carnivores in Ulu Muda, leopard and clouded leopard were published and disseminated via another video, accentuating the importance of Ulu Muda as a wildlife refuge and creating awareness of the threats to these animals in Malaysia.

“I am extremely pleased with how our research has helped saved a pristine forest from logging threats. I recalled seeing many logged areas whilst doing the fieldwork, and it can be quite a devastating sight, especially when it is destroying the homes of large forest cats and many other important animals” said Cedric.

The video was produced by Amy Hong, a close associate of WildCRU on many projects involving wider communication. Amy commented, “I’m so proud to be part of the team that created such extraordinary impact from powerful research. Ulu Muda is vital for securing water resource for the locals, being able to save Ulu Muda from logging would mean so much to both the locals and the researchers that are passionate about conservation.”

Similar stories

Nature must be a partner, not just a provider of services

Research Zoology

Nature based Solutions (NbS) could support transformative change in environmental sustainability - to address major societal challenges, including the climate crisis - according to a new paper from Oxford researchers.

Rapid evolution and host immunity drive the rise and fall of antibiotic resistance during acute infection

Medical science Research Zoology

Antibiotic resistance poses a serious threat to human health, but how resistance emerges during infections remains poorly understood.

Science Blog: Young male fruit flies make females fight each other more

Research Zoology

Dr Ellie Bath, Department of Zoology, writes about research to test whether age, mating history, and feeding status shape an important, but understudied, post-mating response – increased female-female aggression.

The ocean urgently needs truly collaborative science between partners - Oxford scientists

Research Zoology

To ensure a prosperous ocean now and in the future, marine research must offer clear recommendations based on representative information and demonstrate practical pathways, according to new research from Oxford University, the charity Nekton and the Seychelles Environment Ministry.

Researchers say we don’t know how most mammals will respond to climate change

Climate change Zoology

Researchers at the University of Oxford, alongside international collaborators, have found that there is a significant knowledge gap in the risks posed by climate change to mammals.

Scientists confirm bacteria’s genetic ‘Swiss army knife’ is key driver of antibiotic resistance

Zoology

Antibiotic resistance is a huge challenge facing society globally, posing a threat not only to human health but in areas such as food security and the economy. The more we know about the mechanisms behind antibiotic resistance, the better we can respond to these threats.

Similar stories

Nature must be a partner, not just a provider of services

Research Zoology

Nature based Solutions (NbS) could support transformative change in environmental sustainability - to address major societal challenges, including the climate crisis - according to a new paper from Oxford researchers.

Rapid evolution and host immunity drive the rise and fall of antibiotic resistance during acute infection

Medical science Research Zoology

Antibiotic resistance poses a serious threat to human health, but how resistance emerges during infections remains poorly understood.

Science Blog: Young male fruit flies make females fight each other more

Research Zoology

Dr Ellie Bath, Department of Zoology, writes about research to test whether age, mating history, and feeding status shape an important, but understudied, post-mating response – increased female-female aggression.

The ocean urgently needs truly collaborative science between partners - Oxford scientists

Research Zoology

To ensure a prosperous ocean now and in the future, marine research must offer clear recommendations based on representative information and demonstrate practical pathways, according to new research from Oxford University, the charity Nekton and the Seychelles Environment Ministry.

Researchers say we don’t know how most mammals will respond to climate change

Climate change Zoology

Researchers at the University of Oxford, alongside international collaborators, have found that there is a significant knowledge gap in the risks posed by climate change to mammals.

Scientists confirm bacteria’s genetic ‘Swiss army knife’ is key driver of antibiotic resistance

Zoology

Antibiotic resistance is a huge challenge facing society globally, posing a threat not only to human health but in areas such as food security and the economy. The more we know about the mechanisms behind antibiotic resistance, the better we can respond to these threats.