Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click on 'Find out more' to see our Cookie statement.

Open access Nature Biotechnology article shows role FAIRsharing plays in maximising visibility and adoption of standards, databases and repositories

A diagram to represent fair sharing of data

In an open access Nature Biotechnology article, 69 authors have come together as a community, representing the core adopters, advisory board members, and/or key collaborators of the FAIRsharing resource.

They are a diverse set of stakeholders representing academia, industry, funding agencies (e.g. Wellcome Trust), standards organizations (e.g. ISO), governmental institutions (e.g. USA Food and Drug Administration) infrastructure providers (e.g. ELIXIR) and scholarly publishers (e.g. Springer Nature, Wiley, Oxford University Press).

The article shows the role FAIRsharing plays in informing and educating each group to maximize the visibility and adoption of standards, databases and repositories within their community.

Community-developed standards, such as those for the identification, citation and reporting of data, underpin reproducible and reusable research, enable data readiness, aid scholarly publishing, and drive the evolution of scientific practice. Thousands of community-developed standards are available (across all disciplines), many of which have been created and/or implemented by several thousand data repositories.

FAIRsharing maps the landscape of these heterogeneous data and metadata standards and repositories, guides users in the selection of these resources, collaborates with policy makers to facilitate their uptake, and works with developers and maintainers of these resources to foster collaboration and promote harmonization.

We are thrilled to see the impact of our work on a diverse set of stakeholders involved in producing, managing, serving, curating, preserving, publishing or regulating data”, says Professor Susanna-Assunta Sansone, founder of FAIRsharing.

She is also a co-author of the FAIR principles, underpinning Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability and Reusability of the data, which are already influencing UK and European research data management policies.

Navigating through the many resources available can be discouraging and often unappealing for prospective users; often many resources are only known to those within a certain discipline, leading to reinvention and poor reuse. Peter McQuilton, who is the FAIRsharing project coordinator, says: “Our mission is to help consumers to accurately find, select and use standards, databases, repositories and data policies with confidence, and producers to make their resources more discoverable, widely adopted and cited”.

FAIRsharing plays a central role in fostering the wider adoption of standards and repositories, by serving key information that allows journals and funders to keep their data policies up-to-date” says Philippe Rocca-Serra, co-founder of FAIRsharing and co-author of the FAIR principles.

Story courtesy of the Department of Engineering Science

Similar stories

From The Conversation: Nocturnal dinosaurs: Night vision and superb hearing in a small theropod suggest it was a moonlight predator

Earth sciences Research

Roger Benson, Professor of Palaeobiology in the Department of Earth Sciences, and colleagues Lars Schmitz at Scripps College and Jonah Choiniere at the University of the Witwatersrand write about their new research into nocturnal dinosaurs.

Science Blog: Heatstroke: why the hotter the clock, the more accurate its timekeeping

Materials science Research

Dr Natalia Ares from the Department of Materials writes about a new study published in Physical Review X, in which for the first time she and colleagues have measured the entropy generated by a minimal clock.

Pea plants make smart investment decisions that could help inform sustainable agriculture

Plant sciences Research

Researchers in the Department of Plant Sciences have shown that pea plants are able to make smart investment decisions when it comes to interactions with their symbiotic bacterial partners. Better understanding of how plants manage these interactions could help with the move towards sustainable agriculture.

Science Blog: New water-based approach to manufacturing semiconductors

Materials science Research

With the increasing demand for high-tech devices such as smart phones, wearable watches and portable health monitoring devices, the semiconductor manufacturing industry faces a big challenge of fabricating these devices in a sustainable and cost-effective way.

Nature must be a partner, not just a provider of services

Research Zoology

Nature based Solutions (NbS) could support transformative change in environmental sustainability - to address major societal challenges, including the climate crisis - according to a new paper from Oxford researchers.

Rapid evolution and host immunity drive the rise and fall of antibiotic resistance during acute infection

Medical science Research Zoology

Antibiotic resistance poses a serious threat to human health, but how resistance emerges during infections remains poorly understood.

Similar stories

From The Conversation: Nocturnal dinosaurs: Night vision and superb hearing in a small theropod suggest it was a moonlight predator

Earth sciences Research

Roger Benson, Professor of Palaeobiology in the Department of Earth Sciences, and colleagues Lars Schmitz at Scripps College and Jonah Choiniere at the University of the Witwatersrand write about their new research into nocturnal dinosaurs.

Science Blog: Heatstroke: why the hotter the clock, the more accurate its timekeeping

Materials science Research

Dr Natalia Ares from the Department of Materials writes about a new study published in Physical Review X, in which for the first time she and colleagues have measured the entropy generated by a minimal clock.

Pea plants make smart investment decisions that could help inform sustainable agriculture

Plant sciences Research

Researchers in the Department of Plant Sciences have shown that pea plants are able to make smart investment decisions when it comes to interactions with their symbiotic bacterial partners. Better understanding of how plants manage these interactions could help with the move towards sustainable agriculture.

Science Blog: New water-based approach to manufacturing semiconductors

Materials science Research

With the increasing demand for high-tech devices such as smart phones, wearable watches and portable health monitoring devices, the semiconductor manufacturing industry faces a big challenge of fabricating these devices in a sustainable and cost-effective way.

Nature must be a partner, not just a provider of services

Research Zoology

Nature based Solutions (NbS) could support transformative change in environmental sustainability - to address major societal challenges, including the climate crisis - according to a new paper from Oxford researchers.

Rapid evolution and host immunity drive the rise and fall of antibiotic resistance during acute infection

Medical science Research Zoology

Antibiotic resistance poses a serious threat to human health, but how resistance emerges during infections remains poorly understood.