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Two researchers in MPLS have won 2017 Philip Leverhulme Prizes. The award recognises the achievement of outstanding researchers whose work has already attracted international recognition and whose future career is exceptionally promising. The two winners are:

Kayla King, Associate Professor in Parasite Biology at the Department of Zoology. Kayla is interested in fundamental problems in evolutionary biology such as What drives rapid evolution? What are the benefits of sex? Why is genetic diversity so high in natural populations? She investigates these questions by studying the complex interactions between parasites and hosts, and the ecological and genetic aspects of rapid (co)evolution.

Dominic Vella, Professor of Applied Mathematics at the Mathematical Institute. Dominic's research is concerned with various aspects of solid and fluid mechanics in general but with particular focus on the wrinkling of thin elastic objects and surface tension effects. You can see a video of him discussing his work here.

 

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