Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click on 'Find out more' to see our Cookie statement.

Oxford Sparks visited Dr David Howey, associated professor in the department of Engineering, University of Oxford to find out the answer to this week's Big Question...

Most people use their phones every single day for communicating with others, using the Internet, playing games via apps. But there’s nothing worse than looking down at your phone and realising the battery is running out of juice—or worse yet, that it’s already completely dead.

One of the most common problems with smart phones is a quickly-draining battery. So why does our mobile phone batter suck? To find out Oxford Sparks visited Dr David Howey, associated professor in the department of Engineering, University of Oxford to find out!

Listen here: 

Similar stories

UK launches new £10M Research Centre to spur a greener Global Financial System

Climate change Engineering Funding

The centre, led by Oxford, will transform the finance sector’s ability to invest differently to promote climate and environmental action. Researchers from the Oxford eResearch Centre in the Department of Engineering Science are contributing, alongside researchers from other University departments.

UK population movement falls 59%, compared to -89% in March - COVID-19 Monitor

COVID-19 Engineering Maths Research

The latest data from Oxford’s COVID-19 Impact Monitor shows the January lockdown has, so far, had one third less national impact on movement than the March shutdown. The figures demonstrate that some regions are still moving at more than 50% of pre-pandemic levels, despite the tough restrictions and calls for people to remain at home.

Professor Martin Booth receives ERC Proof of Concept grant

Engineering Funding

The project will develop the commercial potential of the novel imaging technology developed by Prof Booth, adaptive optical microscopy.

Spotting elephants from space: a satellite revolution

Engineering Research Zoology

Using the highest resolution satellite imagery currently available, researchers at the University of Oxford Wildlife Conservation Research Unit and Machine Learning Research Group have detected elephants from space with comparable accuracy to human detection capabilities.

Similar stories

UK launches new £10M Research Centre to spur a greener Global Financial System

Climate change Engineering Funding

The centre, led by Oxford, will transform the finance sector’s ability to invest differently to promote climate and environmental action. Researchers from the Oxford eResearch Centre in the Department of Engineering Science are contributing, alongside researchers from other University departments.

UK population movement falls 59%, compared to -89% in March - COVID-19 Monitor

COVID-19 Engineering Maths Research

The latest data from Oxford’s COVID-19 Impact Monitor shows the January lockdown has, so far, had one third less national impact on movement than the March shutdown. The figures demonstrate that some regions are still moving at more than 50% of pre-pandemic levels, despite the tough restrictions and calls for people to remain at home.

Professor Martin Booth receives ERC Proof of Concept grant

Engineering Funding

The project will develop the commercial potential of the novel imaging technology developed by Prof Booth, adaptive optical microscopy.

Spotting elephants from space: a satellite revolution

Engineering Research Zoology

Using the highest resolution satellite imagery currently available, researchers at the University of Oxford Wildlife Conservation Research Unit and Machine Learning Research Group have detected elephants from space with comparable accuracy to human detection capabilities.