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Today the Times Higher Education Supplement reports that the University of Oxford is now ranked top for research income in the UK.

Today the Times Higher Education Supplement reports that the University of Oxford is now ranked top for research income in the UK. The figures are based on the year 2014/15.

The article says:

The University of Oxford climbed from second to first place. Ian Walmsley, Oxford’s pro vice-chancellor for research and innovation, said that the university had not put in more applications for grants and the increase in funding was due to a “few exceptionally large awards”.

This included the EPSRC’s £120 million Quantum Technology Hubs, awarded last November and led by the universities of Oxford, Birmingham, Glasgow and York. 

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