Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click on 'Find out more' to see our Cookie statement.

Marta Kwiatkowska, Department of Computer Science, Trinity College, Oxford has been named as the recipient of the 2019 BCS Lovelace Medal, the top award in computing in the UK, awarded by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT.

The award is presented annually to individuals who, in the opinion of BCS Academy Awards Committee, have made a significant contribution to the advancement of Information Systems.

Professor Kwiatkowska has been recognised for her major contributions to probabilistic and quantitative verification. She has made significant contributions across the breadth of theory, applications and software tools. Her research and her software system PRISM has made a huge impact on computer science in the UK and worldwide. Since 2001 she has led the development of the highly influential probabilistic model checker PRISM

Professor Kwiatkowska explains: “Computing infrastructure has become indispensable in our society, with examples ranging from online banking, to intelligent vehicles and electronic medical equipment. Software faults in such systems can have disastrous consequences.

“My research is concerned with developing modelling and automated verification techniques that can guarantee the stable, safe, secure, timely, reliable and resource-efficient operation of computing systems.” 

PRISM is widely used for research and teaching across the globe; it is highly cited, has been downloaded over 70,000 times and used in over 500 publications to date. It has been shown to be effective for modelling a wide range of applications including communications protocols, molecular and cell biology, and more recently, adaptive and artificial intelligence systems.Ithas proved its usefulness in many distinct fields, including distributed and cloud computing, wireless networks, security, robotics, quantum computing, game theory, biology and nanotechnology. 

The award will be presented to Professor Kwiatkowska at a ceremony at the Royal Society in London next spring. 

Steve FurberChair of BCS Academy Awards Committee says: “Professor Kwiatkowska has made an outstanding contribution to the understanding and advancement of computing and I am delighted that we are awarding her the Lovelace Medal in recognition of her wide range of achievements. The impact she has made to computer science, and her contribution to academic research, makes her a richly deserving recipient of this prestigious award.”

Professor Kwiatkowska says of being presented with the award: “I'm incredibly honoured to be receiving the 2019 Lovelace Medal. It's really exciting to have my work recognised via the award and emphasises the importance and potential of research in probabilistic and quantitative verification.  Over the years, I have worked in conjunction with many collaborators and am grateful for their contributions, none more so than Dr Gethin Norman and Professor David Parker, who worked on the first implementation of PRISM and have provided great support ever since.” 

Nominations for the 2019 award open on Monday 21 October 2019 and close on Friday 24 January 2020. More information can be found at www.bcs.org.uk

Similar stories

‘Citizen scientists’ help researchers gather new insights into polar bear behaviour

Citizen science Research Zoology

Oxford University is working with Canadian researchers on a first-of-its-kind project that will engage citizen volunteers to help advance knowledge about polar bear behaviour in a changing environment by analysing a decade’s worth of images captured by trail cameras.

From The Conversation: Mars InSight: why we’ll be listening to the landing of the Perseverance rover

Earth sciences Physics Research The Conversation

Ben Fernando (Departments of Earth Sciences and Physics) writes about using the Insight mission to detect seismic signals during the landing of Perseverance - the first time that anyone has tried using a spacecraft on the surface of another planet to detect another spacecraft arriving.

New machine learning system developed to identify deteriorating patients in hospital

Biomedical engineering Medical science Research

Researchers in Oxford have developed a machine learning algorithm that could significantly improve clinicians’ ability to identify hospitalised patients whose condition is deteriorating to the extent that they need intensive care.

Science Blog: From rust to riches? Computing goes green...or is that brown?

Computer science Physics Research

Professor Paolo Radaelli from Oxford’s Department of Physics, working with Diamond Light Source, has been leading research into silicon alternatives and his group’s surprising findings are published in Nature on 4th February.

Getting the message right on nature-based solutions to climate change

Climate change Research Zoology

Nature‐based solutions can play a key role in helping to tackle the climate and nature crises, while delivering other benefits for people, according to a new paper today from the Nature-based Solutions Initiative (NbSI) at the University of Oxford - but it is vital to get the message right about how to deliver successful NbS and avoid potential pitfalls.

Science Blog: Listening for a space craft to land on Mars

Physics Research

University physicists believe that, for the first time, they might be able to ‘hear’ a spacecraft land on Mars, when Perseverance arrives at Earth’s ‘near’ neighbour in about a month’s time around 18 February.

Similar stories

‘Citizen scientists’ help researchers gather new insights into polar bear behaviour

Citizen science Research Zoology

Oxford University is working with Canadian researchers on a first-of-its-kind project that will engage citizen volunteers to help advance knowledge about polar bear behaviour in a changing environment by analysing a decade’s worth of images captured by trail cameras.

From The Conversation: Mars InSight: why we’ll be listening to the landing of the Perseverance rover

Earth sciences Physics Research The Conversation

Ben Fernando (Departments of Earth Sciences and Physics) writes about using the Insight mission to detect seismic signals during the landing of Perseverance - the first time that anyone has tried using a spacecraft on the surface of another planet to detect another spacecraft arriving.

New machine learning system developed to identify deteriorating patients in hospital

Biomedical engineering Medical science Research

Researchers in Oxford have developed a machine learning algorithm that could significantly improve clinicians’ ability to identify hospitalised patients whose condition is deteriorating to the extent that they need intensive care.

Science Blog: From rust to riches? Computing goes green...or is that brown?

Computer science Physics Research

Professor Paolo Radaelli from Oxford’s Department of Physics, working with Diamond Light Source, has been leading research into silicon alternatives and his group’s surprising findings are published in Nature on 4th February.

Getting the message right on nature-based solutions to climate change

Climate change Research Zoology

Nature‐based solutions can play a key role in helping to tackle the climate and nature crises, while delivering other benefits for people, according to a new paper today from the Nature-based Solutions Initiative (NbSI) at the University of Oxford - but it is vital to get the message right about how to deliver successful NbS and avoid potential pitfalls.

Science Blog: Listening for a space craft to land on Mars

Physics Research

University physicists believe that, for the first time, they might be able to ‘hear’ a spacecraft land on Mars, when Perseverance arrives at Earth’s ‘near’ neighbour in about a month’s time around 18 February.