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Marta Kwiatkowska, Department of Computer Science, Trinity College, Oxford has been named as the recipient of the 2019 BCS Lovelace Medal, the top award in computing in the UK, awarded by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT.

Marta Kwiatkowska and the Department of Computer Science logo
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