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Professor Dame Angela McLean

Congratulations to Professor Dame Angela McLean in the Department of Zoology who is the MOD's next Chief Scientific Adviser, as announced by Defence Secretary Penny Mordaunt.

Professor Dame McLean will be the first female to hold the role and joins the Department as a distinguished academic with a commitment to science-driven policy. The MOD’s Chief Scientific Adviser (CSA) oversees the Department’s core research programme, leads technology strategy, and works closely with the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) to develop battle-winning capabilities.

Defence Secretary Penny Mordaunt said: "The Chief Scientific Adviser plays a key role in ensuring that our armed forces stay at the cutting edge of technology and innovation."

"It’s poignant that we appoint Professor McLean as our first female Chief Scientific Adviser on International Women in Engineering Day, where we look to increase female participation in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics."

"As a highly respected scientist, Professor McLean is a role model to all those wanting to pursue a career in this area, and will bring extensive knowledge and expertise to the role."

The Chief Scientific Adviser advises on all science and technology matters in Defence, oversees Defence Science and Technology (DST); and works closely with our international allies to build partnerships and tackle shared challenges.

On her appointment, Professor Angela McLean said:

This is an exciting time to be joining the Ministry of Defence, with so much important research going on to keep our armed forces at the forefront of innovation and technology. Britain’s military has a distinguished record in developing and using science and I plan to make sure that we continue to build on that tradition. I hope to use my skills and experience from the range of issues I’ve worked on to continue our world-leading reputation in science and technology.

This article is adapted from the MOD's press release.

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