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Professor Peter Bruce

Professor Peter Bruce FRS, Department of Materials, has been appointed as Physical Secretary and Vice President of the Royal Society. He will take up the position on the Royal Society’s anniversary day, Friday 30 November 2018. Professor Bruce's research interests embrace materials chemistry and electrochemistry, with a particular emphasis on energy storage, especially lithium and sodium batteries. As well as directing the UK Energy Storage Hub (SuperStore) and a consortium on lithium batteries, Professor Bruce is a founder and Chief Scientist of the Faraday Institution, the UK centre for research on electrochemical energy storage.

Professor Bruce said: “I am thrilled to be taking up the position of Physical Secretary. To serve the physical and engineering sciences community in the UK and especially to represent the interests of the relevant Royal Society Fellows is an honour. We always live in uncertain times, but these are perhaps more uncertain than most. I shall do all I can over the next 5 years to support excellence in the physical sciences and engineering. I look forward to working with the Fellows, the President, the other Officers and Staff in the years ahead.”

Professor Bruce succeeds two other MPLS professors who have held the role jointly from 1st April 2018: Professor Ulrike Tillmann (Mathematical Institute) and Professor Brian Foster (Department of Physics). They in turn took over from Professor Alex Halliday (formerly Department of Earth Sciences) who stepped down as Physical Secretary following his move to the Earth Institute at Columbia University. 

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