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New research led by Oxford University has revealed that sweet potato likely arrived naturally in Polynesia in pre-human times - challenging the long standing view that one of the world’s most widely used crops was transported from America to Polynesia by people.

An old-fashioned sailing ship

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Oxford plant scientists discover how to alter colour and ripening rates of tomatoes

The overall process of fruit ripening in tomato (including colour changes and softening) can be changed –speeded up or slowed down – by modifying the expression of a single protein located in subcellular organelles called the plastids. This offers a novel opportunity for crop improvement.

Oxford researchers elected to Royal Society

Six scientists from the University of Oxford, including four from MPLS, have joined the Royal Society as Fellows.

Pea plants make smart investment decisions that could help inform sustainable agriculture

Researchers in the Department of Plant Sciences have shown that pea plants are able to make smart investment decisions when it comes to interactions with their symbiotic bacterial partners. Better understanding of how plants manage these interactions could help with the move towards sustainable agriculture.

Oxford Researchers’ Projects Recognised Through Prominent European Grants

Four Oxford academics have received major European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Grants to fund a range of boundary-pushing research projects in the areas of science and criminology.

Oxford University and Prenetics announce landmark collaboration to scale rapid testing tech globally

Today, the University of Oxford, Prenetics Limited, a global leader in diagnostics and genetic testing, and Oxford Suzhou Centre for Advanced Research (OSCAR) have signed collaboration agreements to further develop the award-winning OxLAMP technology, a rapid, molecular testing technology for infectious diseases.