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Dr Martine Abboud and Dr Jutta Toscano

Two Oxford chemists, Dr Martine Abboud and Dr Jutta Toscano, have both been included on the 2019 Forbes '30 under 30' list in the Science & Healthcare category. This yearly list aims to profile 300 young 'disruptors' across ten categories.

Martine Abboud's chemistry research has advanced understanding of how bacteria develop resistance to the most commonly used type of antibiotics, and how scientists might design new drugs to target resistant bacteria. Next, she's turning her attention to the metabolic enzymes involved in cancer.

To study chemical reactions with more complete control, chemists cool down the reaction materials to almost absolute zero. Jutta Toscano is working on developing new techniques to perform these types of experiments on highly reactive molecules called radicals, further expanding the field of ultra-cold chemistry.

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