Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click on 'Find out more' to see our Cookie statement.

Oxford University has today announced the design team and funding arrangements for a major new building.

A view of Oxford colleges and spires

The replacement to the Tinbergen building in the University’s science area, provisionally called the Centre for Life and Mind Sciences, will be the largest building project the University has ever undertaken and will significantly improve the way psychological and biological science is undertaken in Oxford.

The University has appointed as architects NBBJ, supported by partners, to design the new building on the junction of St Cross Road and South Parks Road.

It has also approved £192 million in capital funding for the project, with additional funding through donor philanthropy.

The Centre will transform the educational experience for students, providing laboratories for undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers, as well as lecture theatres, specialised support laboratories and opportunities for public engagement.

The new building will also aim to facilitate the University’s public and schools outreach through shared opportunities for art, exhibitions, lectures and conferences, offering a ‘window into science’. 

Whilst it will occupy the same site as the existing Tinbergen building, it will enhance this gateway to Oxford’s Science Area and create an exciting public space with better connections to the surrounding area.

Professor Chris Kennard, the University’s senior responsible owner for the project, said: “The Centre will transform the way psychological and biological science is undertaken in Oxford, helping scientists to solve some of our major global challenges. The new Centre will transform the education experience for students, and offer new opportunities for public engagement with our research.

The Tinbergen building was the University’s largest teaching and research building before its closure in February 2017.

Work began on the site in October 2018 to safely remove all asbestos using highly specialist contractors prior to demolition, alongside the development of plans for the new building.

 Further information is available at www.ox.ac.uk/lifeandmind.

Similar stories

Averting an antibiotics apocalypse: major funding announced to tackle resistance to antibiotics

A cross-disciplinary team from the Universities of Oxford, Ulster and UCL have announced major funding from EPSRC to tackle the growing challenge of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR).

Science Blog: The wet market sources of Covid-19: bats and pangolins have an alibi

By David Macdonald, Department of Zoology. The finger of blame has been pointed at wildlife trade in the wet markets of Wuhan, Hubei, China, where this Covid-19 outbreak seems to have originated. But could bats and pangolins really be responsible?

COVID-19 lockdowns significantly reduced transmission of invasive bacterial diseases

A new international study involving University of Oxford researchers has conclusively demonstrated that national lockdowns and public health campaigns introduced at the start of the pandemic have reduced the transmission of bacteria that cause respiratory infections.

SARS-CoV-2 naming system given open platform to harness international scientific collaboration

Researchers at the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh have announced the formalisation of the Pango Network, an international team of experts to oversee the identification and naming of different lineages of SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Oxford plant scientists discover how to alter colour and ripening rates of tomatoes

The overall process of fruit ripening in tomato (including colour changes and softening) can be changed –speeded up or slowed down – by modifying the expression of a single protein located in subcellular organelles called the plastids. This offers a novel opportunity for crop improvement.

Natural climate change solutions highly effective long term

Nature-based solutions (NbS) can contribute to the fight against climate change up to the end of our century, according to new Oxford research in Nature. The analysis suggests that, to limit global temperature rise, we must slash emissions and increase NbS investment to protect, manage and restore ecosystems and land for the future.