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Oxford University has today announced the design team and funding arrangements for a major new building.

A view of Oxford colleges and spires

The replacement to the Tinbergen building in the University’s science area, provisionally called the Centre for Life and Mind Sciences, will be the largest building project the University has ever undertaken and will significantly improve the way psychological and biological science is undertaken in Oxford.

The University has appointed as architects NBBJ, supported by partners, to design the new building on the junction of St Cross Road and South Parks Road.

It has also approved £192 million in capital funding for the project, with additional funding through donor philanthropy.

The Centre will transform the educational experience for students, providing laboratories for undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers, as well as lecture theatres, specialised support laboratories and opportunities for public engagement.

The new building will also aim to facilitate the University’s public and schools outreach through shared opportunities for art, exhibitions, lectures and conferences, offering a ‘window into science’. 

Whilst it will occupy the same site as the existing Tinbergen building, it will enhance this gateway to Oxford’s Science Area and create an exciting public space with better connections to the surrounding area.

Professor Chris Kennard, the University’s senior responsible owner for the project, said: “The Centre will transform the way psychological and biological science is undertaken in Oxford, helping scientists to solve some of our major global challenges. The new Centre will transform the education experience for students, and offer new opportunities for public engagement with our research.

The Tinbergen building was the University’s largest teaching and research building before its closure in February 2017.

Work began on the site in October 2018 to safely remove all asbestos using highly specialist contractors prior to demolition, alongside the development of plans for the new building.

 Further information is available at www.ox.ac.uk/lifeandmind.

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