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Professor Séamus Davis has been appointed to spearhead a pioneering research programme to study Quantum Materials for Quantum Technology, in a joint appointment between University College Cork (UCC) and the University of Oxford.

Oxford Quantum - a quantum computer component

The appointment of Professor Davis is supported in Ireland through a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) Research Professorship and an SFI Infrastructure Award, and in the UK via a European Research Council Advanced Grant Award. Professor Davis is currently the James Gilbert White Distinguished Professor in the Physical Sciences at Cornell University, and one of the pioneers of low-temperature Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy and Spectroscopy (STM/STS). Professor Davis will build an STM/STS programme in the ultra-stable laboratories of the Department of Physics' new Beecroft Building.

Professor Ian Shipsey, Chair of the Physics Department and Henry Moseley Centenary Professor of Experimental Physics, commented: "I am thrilled that Séamus will be joining our very distinguished faculty. At Oxford with support from the university and our alumni we have just opened the Beecroft Building which houses one of the finest low vibration science facilities in the world. This is the perfect platform for Seamus to continue his ground breaking research utilising scanning tunneling and spectroscopic imaging scanning tunnelling microscopes that will be installed here. The new partnership between UCC and Oxford has the potential to make significant contributions to the Second Quantum Revolution teaching us new things about the universe in which we live and globally improving the human condition."

For more on this story see the University College Cork news item.

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