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Royal academy of engineering 2

Four engineers at Oxford University are among fifty to have been elected as Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering.

Those honoured include Professors Eleanor Stride and Roger Reed of the Department of Engineering Science, Ursula Martin, Professor of Computer Science at the Department of Computer Science, and Professor Anne Trefethen, Fellow of St Cross College.

The 50 new Fellows were formally admitted to the Academy at its AGM in London on Wednesday 6th September. Of the nine new women RAEng Fellows, three are from Oxford.

Professor Trefethen is the University’s Chief Information Officer and Pro-Vice Chancellor for Academic Resources & Information Systems. She is also Professor of Scientific Computing and member of the Engineering department.  Her work has been largely on numerical algorithms and software development as one of the pioneers of massively parallel algorithms and  a leader in the field of e-science.

Professor Ursula Martin holds an EPSRC Established Career Fellowship, and a Senior Research Fellowship at Wadham College. Her research, initially in algebra, logic and the use of computers to create mathematical proofs, now focuses on wider social and cultural approchaes to understanding the success and impact of current and historical computer science research.

Professor Roger Reed is a world leader in the engineering and science of high-temperature alloys, particularly the design and processing of nickel superalloys, which are ubiquitous in the aero-engine and power-generation industries. His sustained efforts in process modelling have been instrumental in the impact on industrial practice.

Eleanor Stride, Professor of Engineering, has won recognition for outstanding engineering accomplishment in diverse areas. Her main primary research achievements have been in the development of micro and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery. She has also actively advanced the public presentation of engineering in broadcasting, exhibitions, lectures and videos, and has worked as a most effective advocate in advancing the cause and ideals of engineering.

Professor Dame Ann Dowling OM DBE FREng FRS, President of the Royal Academy of Engineering, said: ‘Since 130 engineers were first called together in 1976 to form the Fellowship of Engineering, our Fellows have come together to advance and promote excellence in engineering. I’m so proud to welcome our new Fellows, who represent the very best of UK engineering. From technology giants to our universities’ finest minds, our new Fellows demonstrate how engineering is tackling some of the biggest challenges facing the world. I look forward to working with them as we continue to make the UK a leading nation for engineering innovation and businesses.’

Story courtesy of the University of Oxford News Office