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Taken from the ABSW website:

Truth is in the spotlight -- there’s much debate about how to find it and whether it still carries weight in our society. Media covering UK and US politics have lamented how truth is being sacrificed to misinformation, myth, spin or outright lies. During the US pre-election period, publishers from the Guardian to the New York Times to NPR pushed their fact-checking services. The need to tackle fake news then captured the attention of major social media players like Facebook.

Journalism is reflecting hard on how to adapt to deal with what’s seen as the era of post-truth, and science commentators have lamented how evidence is being sacrificed to spin and fake news.

What’s the role of science journalism in these debates? This panel discussion aims to jump-start a conversation around this question among the science journalism community.

The point of departure is that journalism and science aim for truth in different ways, and both are being challenged. On one hand, recent events suggest a deep questioning of what counts as a believable fact and truth. How does this relate to science journalism practice? On the other hand, the crisis of trust in scientific evidence has arguably been building for some time, perhaps most clearly in the case of climate change. Is science losing its relevance as a source of truth, and what’s the role of journalists in communicating a science that the public can trust?

Moderator: Mun-Keet Looi, editor, Wellcome Trust

Speakers:

  • Philip Ball, science writer

  • Jane Gregory, science communication scholar

  • James Ball, special correspondent at Buzzfeed and author of Post-truth: How bullshit conquered the world

  • Andy Miah, chair in science communication programme, University of Salford

WHEN

Thursday 2 November 2017

Doors open 6.30pm, start 7pm, finish 8.30pm

WHERE

Bloomsbury Room at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society,  66-68 E Smithfield, Whitechapel, London E1W 1AW

REGISTRATION

This event is free for ABSW members but you need to register to attend

Non members may attend at a cost of £15 inc VAT which includes tea/coffee and biscuits on arrival please register and pay

Non members may join the ABSW to attend, currently you receive a 50% discount off annual rates as memberships renew in January each year. If you wish to join please complete complete your membership application and also register indicating that you are joining to attend.

Please note only those who have pre-registered will be allowed entry to the event.

 

Visit the ABSW website for more information.