Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Using your own research and interests, learn the essential ingredients of a compelling narrative, how draw an audience into a story and keep them involved and how to turn your story into an effective pitch.

Course details

This course has now run - please check the Oxford Sparks website for announcements on further courses.

This workshop aims to identify the key features and techniques employed in creating and telling great stories, which form the basis of any effective communication.  Your own research and interests are used as the raw material for the workshop.  The workshop is led by Caroline van den Brul, a former science and technology producer with the BBC who has developed a series of creativity and narrative skills workshops to support Wellcome Trust scientists and other experts impress the public (and funding bodies) with the value of their work.  The goals for the workshop are to help specialists to construct effective narratives around their own work: to attract and engage an audience as well as challenge and inspire them with new ideas and a sense of possibility.

Specifically the participants will gain an understanding of:

  • the essential ingredients of a compelling narrative.
  • how to draw an audience into a story and how to keep them involved.
  • how the ingredients can be honed for different purposes - to influence a decision, to sell yourself, to sell an idea. In other words to make an effective ‘pitch’.

This course is available to all graduate students and research staff, and is part of a wider range of researcher training opportunities.  Further information on training opportunities in public engagement and science communication, at Oxford and further afield, can be found on the Oxford Sparks website.