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Researchers from three MPLS departments (Statistics, Engineering Science and Computer Science) have led and contributed to a paper in Science which assessed the most effective non-pharmaceutical interventions at suppressing transmission of COVID-19. Researchers from other UK universities, as well as universities in Australia, the Czech Republic and the USA, were also involved. The research showed that closing all educational institutions, limiting gatherings to 10 people or less, and closing face-to-face businesses each reduced transmission considerably. The additional effect of stay-at-home orders was comparatively small.

The paper, Inferring the effectiveness of government interventions against COVID-19, was published in Science on Tuesday 15th December.  Read the full paper

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