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Researchers at the University of Oxford have led a large collaboration to map the global distribution of nCoV-2019, commonly known as the Coronavirus.

Map of China showing spread of coronavirus

Working with Boston Children's Hospital, Tsinghua University, Harvard University, and Northeastern University, published reports from national, provincial, and municipal health governments are being used to curate an up to date, geographically precise database of confirmed cases of 2019-nCoV.

The risks of this virus are quickly evolving, and up to date information is needed to inform decisions on how to contain the spread of the virus. Furthermore, including demographic and geographic information can be used to anticipate upcoming risks.

Lead researcher Moritz Kraemer says, ‘This data has already been used successfully by multiple groups to inform public health and we are glad to see that open data sharing during outbreaks can have such a positive effect’. This database will continue to be updated, and this information will be used to understand the spread of the virus across China and beyond.

See the interactive coronavirus map here.

Story courtesy of the Department of Zoology website

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