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View of the Radcliffe Camera and Oxford colleges

Congratulations to those researchers who have been awarded Royal Society University Research Fellowships for 2020. Some are already at Oxford and some will move here to take up their fellowship. The Research Fellowship scheme was established to identify outstanding early career scientists who have the potential to become leaders in their chosen fields and provide them with the opportunity to build an independent research career. The awardees are as follows:

Dr Bruno Bertini, Department of Physics - Organising Principles in Out-of-Equilibrium Quantum Matter

Dr Christopher O'Reilly, Department of Physics - Extratropical climate variability: what are we missing?

Dr Erik Panzer, Mathematical Institute - Quantum perturbation theory at large orders

Dr Ronelle Roth, Department of Plant Sciences - Hitching-a-Ride in Extracellular Vesicles: Inter-kingdom Cargo Trafficking During Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

Dr Claudia Tait, Department of Chemistry - Insights into Fundamental Processes in Solar Energy Technology by Advanced EPR

Dr Richard Wade, Mathematical Institute - Automorphisms and duality in geometric group theory 

Dr Mao Zeng, Department of Physics - Scattering amplitudes and applications to precision QCD and gravitational waves

Venki Ramakrishnan, the President of the Royal Society said, “The URF scheme celebrates and rewards high calibre early career scientists throughout the UK and Ireland. While Brexit and the pandemic will have an impact on early career researchers, it is gratifying to see this year’s URF scheme continuing to support talented researchers from around the world. This is vital for sustaining the talent pipeline that the UK’s science and innovation sector relies on. The scheme’s alumni go on to achieve great things within their disciplines, with their research contributing to the advancement of our society.”

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