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The Vice-Chancellor Innovation Awards celebrate research-led innovation that is having societal or economic impact.

Innovation at Oxford

Congratulations to the MPLS researchers and projects which have been highly commended in several categories of this year's VC's Innovation Awards. Winners and Highly Commended entries were selected by the Vice-Chancellor’s Innovation Awards panel chaired by Professor Chas Bountra, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Innovation, and comprising academics from each of the four Divisions and Professional Services staff who support impact and innovation across the collegiate University. Building on the awards two years ago a new category of Policy Engagement has been added to those for Teamwork, Building Capacity, Inspiring Leadership, and Early Career Innovator.

Team Work

Highly Commended: 

Building Capacity

Highly Commended: 

Policy Engagement

Highly Commended: 

See the full list of winners in all categories

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